Listing Descriptions—What Do I Write?

descriptions

Shop Descriptions—What Do I Write?

When it comes to listing descriptions, more is better than less. I know it is a pain to write about your piece. But how else will folks know how cool it is? Here are some ideas to get you started.

1) Pretend They Are In Front of You
Let’s say you were sell your item in a shop. Someone walks in, sees it, and asks you about it. What would you tell them? What would you ask them? (ALWAYS ask questions, right?) What would be the top three selling points that you’d tell the person about your item? Make sure those come first in your description.

2) Help Them Solve a Problem
How is your item going to be just the thing they need to solve their problem? After all, people buy stuff to solve some kind of problem they have, right? They buy the necklace because they need something to wear with their new sweater. They buy the hat because it’s 10 below in Minnesota and their head is freezing. They buy the toy because they need something to give their niece when she visits next month. They buy the soap because they stink. You get the idea.  You might have to ask and answer the questions for them, since they aren’t standing in front of you. You could say, “looking for that special statement necklace to wear to your class reunion? This necklace will turn everyone’s heads. Even the popular girls, and your old boyfriend’s!” Maybe that’s too much, but hopefully it makes the point. Get to the heart of why your customer needs what you’re selling, and then tell them why they should buy your item instead of the one they just put in their shopping cart.

3) Keep Instructions and Rules Simple and Positive
Nobody likes to be told what you can’t do for them. On the other hand, you have to clearly state what you can accomplish. Strike a happy medium by being as specific as you can about details and state them in the most positive way possible.

4) Find Your Voice—and Use it Everywhere
Let’s go back to your storefront again. You see customers you know come in every day. What do they think about you? Are they glad to see you? Do you treat them the same way every time they come in? Or do they wish the other lady was working today? Are you moody, negative and unhelpful? How about the new customers? Are they glad they came in? Does how you act and what you say have anything to do with that? Of course it does! So, how do we translate that into a shop description?  Etsy is a very social web site. People want to know the people they are buying from. They will buy from someone who is friendly and helpful, and that starts with your description. Let your personality come through. Again, pretend you’re talking face-to-face with your buyer. Engage them and charm them with your wit and personality. Then, once you’ve got a voice, use the same one in your convos, in your print brochure, on Facebook, on your blog and everywhere you are. Be positive, helpful, and informative. Having a consistent voice will really pay off in repeat business. Just like the folks who walk in your store and are glad to see you, your voice in your descriptions will make your buyer glad they stopped in to shop at your store.

OK, go work on those shop descriptions. I’ll wait.

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